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Ivan Picelj: Oeuvre programmée

Ivan Picelj: Oeuvre programmée Denise René Gallery Paris, 1966. 50x65 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Harold Pinter: Gorgona 8 (CRO)

Harold Pinter: Tea Party. Gorgona No. 8, 1965. Josip Vaništa, vlastita naklada. Croatian language edition. Tekst na hrvatskom jeziku. Vaništa sent Harold Pinter the seven issues of Gorgona that had already come out and asked him to “design his issue like Vasarely and others had done”. Pinter, in turn, sent his short story “Tea Party”, which was published in 1965. The Gorgona Group , was a Croatian avant-garde art group which consisted of artists and art historians: Dimitrije Bašičević-Mangelos, Miljenko Horvat, Marijan Jevšovar, Julije Knifer, Ivan Kožarić, Matko Meštrović, Radoslav Putar, Đuro Seder, Josip Vaništa, operated along the lines of anti-art in Zagreb between 1959 and 1966. Beside individual works linked to traditional techniques, the members proposed different concepts and forms of artistic communication and published the anti-magazine Gorgona - 11 issues. Autor: Harold Pinter Izdavač: Josip Vaništa, Zagreb Izdanje: prvo/first Godina: 1965 Uvez: meki Format: 20,8 x 19,2 Stranica: 14
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Nuša i Srečo Dragan

Nuša i Srečo Dragan Tri dopisnice za crtežima Sreče Dragana iz 1970. godine. Crteži i tekstovi vezani uz film H2O. 14x9cm Dopisnica 1: Roka na maski na obrazu Dopisnica 2: Roka v zraku na zraku Dopisnica 3: Roka v zraku na nogi Nusa was born in Jesenice in 1943 and her partner Sreco, in Spodnji Hrastnik in 1944. Nusa earned her degree in Pedagogy and Sociology at the University of Ljubljana. Sreco earned his degree in painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana, where he completed his postgraduate studies under prof. Zoran Didek. In 1971 Sreco attended a class in New Media in London. Between 1967 and 1988 Nusa and Sreco worked together artistically as a couple. In 1969, they filmed the first video in the former Yugoslavia (White Milk of White Breasts). During 1968-1969 they participated in the work of OHO. Their beginnings belong to reizm, arte povera, conceptualism, contextualization of language, installation, and usage of new technologies, film and video. Since 1998 Nusa has lived and worked as an independent video artist in Ljubljana. Sreco Dragan has lectured at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana since 1989, where he is a professor of video and new media. His latest art practice is focused on net-video, Internet art installations and computer animation.
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Julije Knifer

Julije Knifer Atelier Brane Horvata (Horetzky) Zagreb, 2003. 69 x 49 cm. (27.2 x 19.3 in.) Edition 50 Signed and numbered 15/50 High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Julije Knifer

Julije Knifer Atelier Brane Horvata (Horetzky) Zagreb, 2003. 69 x 49 cm. (27.2 x 19.3 in.) Edition 50 Signed and numbered 18/50 High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Attila Csernik

Attila Csernik Box Walesilainen Signed and dated, 1972 Dimensions: 16,5 x 16,5 cm Collage: cardboard, newspapers Attila Csernik (1941., Bačka Topola, Vojvodina, Serbia). Artist and visual poet. Joined the Bosch+Bosch Group upon Szombathy’s invitation in 1973 and remained its member until 1976.
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Mangelos: Fenomen Picasso

Mangelos: Fenomen Picasso Plakat i pozivnica / katalog Novi Sad, Tribina mladih 17.-30.04.1972. Sitotisak / Silkprint Katalog i plakat Mangelos Štampa: Prosveta, Novi Sad Klišea: Forum, Novi Sad Urednici galerije: Csernik Attila, Mirko Radojičić, Biljana Tomić Katalog: 4p / A4. Colour version. Plakat: 29,6x39,6 cm
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Man Ray: Cadeau

Man Ray (Emmanuel Radnitzky): Cadeau Mixed media - Signed - 1479/5000 - 1974 "Cadeau" by Man Ray is the most coveted DaDa surrealist movement object. It consists of an everyday continental flat iron of the sort that had to be heated on a stove, transformed here into a non-functional, disturbing object by the addition of a single row of fourteen nails In 1974, Man Ray realised this edition in collaboration with Luciano Anselmino of Galleria "Il Fauno", Turin. Original packaging, Like new. A numbered, credit card-size, card was numbered and monogrammed by Man Ray. A certificate, with number, of the famous Arturo Schwarz is also included. 17×10 cm
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Victor Vasarely: Cinetiques

Victor Vasarely: Cinétiques 5 sets of rodoïds Silkscreen/Serigraph Éditions du Griffon, Suisse, 1973. 29×24 cm 10 serigraphs: black on white background or vice versa, working in pairs. Each of the 5 images is printed on paper and then on a transparent plastic sheet, which allows an optical game by superposition. (Rodoïd) Victor Vasarely 3D Wall Sculpture/object - Set of 8. Measures 11x13x2 inches Each. 2 layers- Top layer printed on clear Lucite , bottom print on paper. From the portfolio Vasarely Cinetiques. Published by Edition Du Griffon Neuchatel. Circa 1973. Printed in Switzerland.
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Jesus Rafael Soto: Composition

Jesus Rafael Soto: Composition 1963-1965 silkprint 50x70 cm signed and numbered edition 8/100
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Enzo Mari

Enzo Mari Enzo Mari (Italian, born 1932) ENSEMBLE DE TROIS CUBES Circa 1960 Medium: polyester resin Size: 7 x 7 x 7 cm. (2.8 x 2.8 x 2.8 in.) Editeur Danese Sculpture cinétique
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Damnjan: Campione dell`artista

Radomir Damnjanović Damnjan Uzorak umetnika Campione dell`artista 1978. Mixed media: pečati, tekst, tkanina, fotografija 65 x 47 cm
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Maj 75 A

Maj 75, broj A; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 B

Maj 75, broj B, 1978; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Grupa jedan, dva tri, Mangelos, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Na upit

Maj 75 D

Maj 75, broj D, 1979; Vlasta Delimar, Željko Jerman, Boris Demur, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Goran Trbuljak, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 Dž

Maj 75, broj Dž, 1980;Jovan Čekić, Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Stanislav Filko, Tomislav Gotovac, Vladimir Gudac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Sergio Pausig, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Fedor Vučemilović, Iris Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Na upit

Maj 75 Đ

Maj 75, broj Đ, 1980;Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Vlado Martek, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Zoran Popović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
8.500,00 kn

Maj 75 E

Maj 75, broj E, 1981; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar; na naslovnici Zlatko Kutnjak "Izgažena umjetnost" 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Na upit

Maj 75 G

Maj 75, broj G, 1981; Darivoj Čada, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Živko Kladnik, Vlado Martek, Lela Mujkić, Rajko Radovanović, Darko Šimičić, Raša Todosijević, Egist Zagoričnik, Franci Zagoričnik, Orest Zagoričnik, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac; korice izradio Tomislav Gotovac "Prošenje"
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Maj 75 H

Maj 75, broj H, 1982; Tomislav Gotovac, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar, Živko Kladnik, Branka Stanković, Franci Zagoričnik, Zan Futranovitch Toupillon, Rajko Radovanović
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Maj 75 L

Maj 75, broj L, 16.1.1984;Nenad Bogdanović, Mangelos, Antun Maračić, Raša Todosijević, Jusuf Hadžifejzović, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Rajko Radovanović, Boris Demur
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Ivan Picelj: Homage to El Lissitzky

Ivan Picelj: Homage to El Lissitzky Dimensions: 35×49.8 cm Publisher: Kultura, Zagreb 1957. Sitotisak / Silkprint Signed and numbered. Uredništvo: Božo Bek, Zlatko Prica, Dragovan Šepić Tehnički urednik: Ivan Picelj Tisak: Atelier za serigrafiju, Zagreb Otisnuli: Zvonimir Melnjak i Mirka Mader Prva grafička mapa Ivana Picelja.
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OHO: Knjiga Aleša Kermavnera

Aleš Kermavner 1946-1966 OHO, Ljubljana 1966 20,3x14,7 cm cjelokupno književno naslijeđe objavljeno je iste godine u Knjizi Aleša Kermavnera u kojoj su objavljeni i otisci kanala i ostalih objekata. Aleš Kermavner's suicide on April, 3, strongly affects his colleagues. His literary legacy is published the same year in the Book of Aleš Kermavner and also features imprints of ducts and other objects. V Ljubljani, Kulturna komisija pri univerzitet- nem odboru Zveze študentov Jugoslavije, t. Učne delavnice 1966.) (64) str.
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Sven Stilinović: Podroom

Artist Book 21x29,5 cm Radna zajednice umjetnika Podroom, Zagreb 1979. Samostalna izložba Svena Stilinovića se održala 6. - 13. ožujka 1979. Povodom te izložbe autor je objavio katalog s replikama radova i tekst. U tekstu piše o "velikim" radovima i objašnjava što ih čini velikima (dimenzije, što neobičniji materijal, višeznačnost i slojevitost). Smatra da umjetnici koji rade "velika djela" znaju gdje ih treba prezentirati, a to nisu mali prostori nego oni većih dimenzija i velikog značaja. Na ovoj izložbi izložio je seriju tekstova na papiru i dvije kamene kocke dimenzija 1 x 1 x 1 m, naziva Skulpura 1 i Skulptura 2. Skulpturu 3 je postavio u park Ribnjak 1. ožujka 1979., pa je u katalogu objavio dvije fotografije spomenute skulpture.
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