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Mangelos: Shid-Theory

Screenprint on cardboard, 8 pages, published by the artist. 14 1/10 × 9 4/5 in. 35.8 × 25 cm. As he himself accurately foresaw, Dimitrije Bašičević Mangelos died in 1987 at the age of 66; in his manifesto Shid Theory, published and exhibited in
10.000,00 kn

Victor Vasarely: Gorgona 4 (FRA)

Gorgona no 4. Francuski / French 4/61. VictorVasarely 1961 Nice condition screenprinted cover and screenprinted insert page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" (21 x 19.2 cm) privée Vasarely's Gorgona includes several drawings from that period and the author's
10.000,00 kn

Bit International: Complete 1-9

The bit international journal was published as part of the activities of the New Tendencies movement. The objective of the editors was: “to present information theory, exact aesthetics, design, mass media, visual communication, and related subjects, and t
10.000,00 kn

Victor Vasarely: Gorgona 4 (CRO)

Victor Vasarely: Gorgona 4 (CRO) Gorgona no 4. Victor Vasarely 1961. Croatian language edition. Edition privée, Josip Vaništa, Zagreb, Yougoslavie. Exemplarie 113 / 250 Izdanje na hrvatskom jeziku. Screenprinted cover and screenprinted insert page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" (21 x 19.2 cm) Vasarely's Gorgona includes several drawings from that period and the author's text. Fine condition. The Gorgona Group, was a Croatian avant-garde art group which consisted of artists and art historians: Dimitrije Bašičević-Mangelos, Miljenko Horvat, Marijan Jevšovar, Julije Knifer, Ivan Kožarić, Matko Meštrović, Radoslav Putar, Đuro Seder, Josip Vaništa, operated along the lines of anti-art in Zagreb between 1959 and 1966. Beside individual works linked to traditional techniques, the members proposed different concepts and forms of artistic communication and published the anti-magazine Gorgona - 11 issues. Autor: Victor Vasarely Izdavač: Josip Vaništa, Zagreb Izdanje: prvo/first Godina: 1961 Uvez: meki Format: 20,8x19.2
10.000,00 kn

Stjepan Planić: Problemi savremene arhitekture

Stjepan Planić: Problemi savremene arhitekture Zagreb, 1932. 23x31 cm 240pp Tvrdi uvez In Planiæ's practice of building detached houses on hills and green slopes of woodlands of the Sljeme, the regulation defining that living spaces should be looking on the street, opening the possibility of a representative façade, and the utility spaces at the back of a house, proved to be senseless and unreasonable. One of his earliest projects, a house in Jabukovac, will from that time on serve as an example of an architect's victory in his endeavours to create architecture "intended for the better life of man". Planiæ's belief in humanistic principles of the modern architecture, his persistence in the struggle to realise them and the strength of his argumentation, with considerable quantity of his personal charm, won him the triumph in confronting the regulations. It would "in the future be the aim of progress, not an obstacle." He spoke of this optimistic delusion of his, from that time, on the occasion of receiving the Life Achievements Award "Vladimir Nazor" in 1968. "The struggle for the modern is not yet won." The drawings accompanying Planiæ's projects during the interwar period witness of his personal friendship with a distinctive and a great painter Ernest Tomaševiæ, who graphically designed a number of Planiæ's articles, exhibitions and competition works. Planiæ's opus, with 700 projects and realisations, as far as we know, belongs to the most numerous and is also one where family houses prevailed around which he designed gardens. In the most individual and authentic manner he applied the vocabulary of the two idioms of the contemporary architecture - the international functional and the regionally organic. Combining the two on a structural level he created works (the stereometrically pure Round Villa in Gornje Prekrižje, the Tomislav Mountaineers Home of an Y- layout from the thirties and the cube-house from the fifties), which are anthology examples of the 20th century art memorials, as well as of the entire Croatian architecture. My assumption is that the Zagreb School of modern architecture managed to realise syntheses hard to find elsewhere, primarily in the works of Drago Ibler and Stjepan Planiæ. I believe that when explaining the Zagreb school of modern architecture, as we call it, it would be proper to apply a thesis of Ljubo Karaman, our local art historian of "creating the freedom of a peripheral environment", instead of inappropriately importing hypotheses pertaining to literature and ideology. It can explain the specificity of Ibler's and Planiæ's opuses in an infinitely more objective and convincing manner, even of the Zagreb school of modern architecture as a whole. As distinguished from a provincial milieu adopting norms and imitating solutions of great centres, Karaman believes a peripheral milieu to be the one sufficiently distanced from more powerful cultural centres (and norms and dogmas dominating them) and according to him Croatia is a typical country suited to this notion. It offers an artist greater freedom of creation, without respect for the sometimes-rigid criteria ruling great centres and power-focuses, gives him a chance to draw from two or more sources and to make creative synthesis in auspicious moments. In the earlier mentioned Stjepan Planiæ's book just about every published example is of a building ending with a living terrace and a flat roof, it is almost a manifesto. These were the common qualities of the represented projects and works. Perhaps at the time they displayed the most expressive mark of distinction from the historical, particularly the historicism architecture of roofs and metal domes of Zagreb. Stjepan Planiæ, speaking in a documentary from 1978, standing on a terrace of a multi-storey building in the Petriæ's Street 5, on the so-called “Zakladni blok” in the heart of Zagreb, designed by himself, alluded to the continuity of forms and to the significance of a terrace in the architecture of ancient civilisations and not to the paragons of contemporary building. Gesturing towards the tin dome of the First Croatian Savings Bank building, the popular Octagon, he said: "All these roofs, all these domes were the composition equipment of the preceding generation, which was then called great architecture. Driven by an aspiration to bring gardens into the centre of the city, to offer a man in urban environment a commodity of a meadow, brook, or a forest, we realised them on terraces where they blossom even today. The hanging gardens of the Queen Semiramis are not a dream, this terrace realised 40 years ago proves that, it literally realises a connection between a man and the juices of nature." "To organise life…" as Planiæ often repeated, did not mean to impose solutions, but to creatively answer the demands of life and harmoniously resolve human needs within the architectonic space. Besides writing (to begin with a book for adults "Problems of Contemporary Architecture," from 1932, to "Culture of Living," from 1985, intended for children) Planiæ wanted to effect immediate influence on individuals and small family communities. For that, he would always find time. "Three Letters on Housing" were just an example and a pattern, a drop in the ocean of talks and interpretations that Planiæ had led with the people he built houses for or with those who wanted him to design a home for them. During the seventies I often drove Planiæ on his tours of construction sites and the adaptation of my terrace apartment was taking place at that time, too. I observed a relationship of true respect and absolute obedience on the part of his craftsmen, regardless of whether they worked with him for forty years or had been engaged only recently. It was rather unusual, since in his designs and in his demands on craftsmen Planiæ always went further, often demanding new, bold and uncommon procedures. Construction carriers designed by Planiæ would, as a rule, be more slender than others were, his windows were bigger (not to mention that they were of better proportions) than those in the neighbourhood. He often "broke" the regulations of dimensioning (excessive, as a rule, due to safety precautions). He defined them according to proportions, according to the formative criteria of the whole. For example, a board of reinforced concrete of a balcony usually appears thickset and in the Round Villa (1936), the round balcony board girding three quarters of the cylindrical body of the villa is deeply protruded into space, boldly thin, elegantly elevated in space. "It even vibrates a little," commented Planiæ. That was the earliest example I can recall. In his inexhaustible creativity he always made room for something new, ranging from the use of building materials and construction to the formation. It was particularly evident in the organisation of space, which he kept returning to in his later projects, most often dealing with a dynamic play in connecting of different levels within a flat.
10.000,00 kn

Josip Stošić: Nacrti Za Pet Mojih I Jednu Vašu Pjesmu

Studentski Centar Sveucilista u Zagrebu, Josip Stosic, Zagreb, 1976. Paperback. Book Condition: Good. French poet and critic, Stephane Mallarme (1842 – 1898) was a major French symbolist poet, and his work anticipated and inspired several revolutionary ar
10.000,00 kn

OHO: Gobe v Knjigi

Gobe v Knjigi (Mushrooms in a book) Iztok Geister (I.G. Plamen) and Marko Pogačnik Ljubljana, 1968. Drawings of mushrooms, circular holes in the front cover and the leaves and colored paper chips acting with the holes. Card covers, spiral binding. 9.1 x 22 cm 40pp letterpress, offset, collages and die-cut pages, spiral bound, 20 sheets
10.000,00 kn

Nuša i Srečo Dragan

Nuša i Srečo Dragan Tri dopisnice za crtežima Sreče Dragana iz 1970. godine. Crteži i tekstovi vezani uz film H2O. 14x9cm Dopisnica 1: Roka na maski na obrazu Dopisnica 2: Roka v zraku na zraku Dopisnica 3: Roka v zraku na nogi Nusa was born in Jesenice in 1943 and her partner Sreco, in Spodnji Hrastnik in 1944. Nusa earned her degree in Pedagogy and Sociology at the University of Ljubljana. Sreco earned his degree in painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana, where he completed his postgraduate studies under prof. Zoran Didek. In 1971 Sreco attended a class in New Media in London. Between 1967 and 1988 Nusa and Sreco worked together artistically as a couple. In 1969, they filmed the first video in the former Yugoslavia (White Milk of White Breasts). During 1968-1969 they participated in the work of OHO. Their beginnings belong to reizm, arte povera, conceptualism, contextualization of language, installation, and usage of new technologies, film and video. Since 1998 Nusa has lived and worked as an independent video artist in Ljubljana. Sreco Dragan has lectured at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana since 1989, where he is a professor of video and new media. His latest art practice is focused on net-video, Internet art installations and computer animation.
10.000,00 kn

Sanja Iveković: Ugo la Pietra

Sanja Iveković: Ugo la Pietra – Ponovno prisvajanje okoline Plakat izložbe Galerija suvremene umjetnosti, Zagreb 1975. High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak Atelier Brane Horvat / Studio S Plakat je iz dva djela. 68x100 cm
10.000,00 kn

Ivan Picelj: Galerija suvremene umjetnosti

Ivan Picelj: Galerija suvremene umjetnosti 50x70cm Zagreb, 1963. godine High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak Plakat za Galeriju suvremene umjetnosti. Plakat je izveden u 4 boje (crna, smeđa, plava i tamno plavo) na bijelom papiru. Podijeljen na dvije plohe, donja manja u tamno plavoj, gornja veća crne boje. Unutar veće plohe plavi kvadrat.
10.000,00 kn

Dalibor Martinis: Kožarić

Dalibor Martinis: Ivan Kožarić Plakat za izložbu: Zagreb, Galerija suvremene umjetnosti, 1975. Potpisan: Ivan Kožarić Silkprint - Zagreb: Studio S 98,5 x 69 cm Fotografije Petar Dabac
10.000,00 kn

Maj 75 E

Maj 75, broj E, 1981; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar; na naslovnici Zlatko Kutnjak "Izgažena umjetnost" 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
10.000,00 kn

Ivan Ladislav Galeta

Ivan Ladislav Galeta Otisak strelice u sitotisku Silkprint / Sitotisak 48,9 x 68,8 cm Motovunski susreti, 1978 Signed and numbered 37/50
10.000,00 kn

Ivan Picelj: Soto

Ivan Picelj: Soto Plakat za izložbu "Soto" Galerijia suvremene umjetnosti, Zagreb, 1970. godine. Sitotisak / Silkprint 50x70cm Plakat izveden u 3 boje na bijelom papiru (plava, crna, siva). Plakat je horizontalno podijeljen u 2 dijela. Veća, gornja površina pravokutnika je plave boje a u vrhu je upisano naziv izložbe i podaci. Donji sivi pravokutnik je manji, unutar njega se nalaze dva izdužena pravokutnika crno plave boje. I plavi i sivi pravokutnik uokvireni su crnom linijom. Jesús-Rafael Soto, Venezuelan-born French artist (born July 5, 1923, Ciudad Bolívar, Venez.—died Jan. 17, 2005, Paris, France), attached himself to avant-garde modernism immediately after World War II and by the late 1960s had become known as a leader in optical and kinetic art, with works that were remarkable for their illusions of sensory vibrations. He lived in Caracas before immigrating in 1950 to Paris. There his works were shown in a number of groundbreaking exhibits, notably in 1955 as part of the group “Le Mouvement” show, which included works by Marcel Duchamp and Viktor Vasarely. For Spiral with Red, the centrepiece of that exhibit, Soto used a layering effect on painted geometric shapes that had an illusory effect on viewers as they passed by. Soto’s experiments with the perception of movement led him to build much larger sculptural works that invited viewers to walk through, beginning with his Pénétrables series. He constructed enormous outdoor exhibits, some of which were public commissions. Soto exhibited widely in Europe, particularly from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, when he was at the peak of his career. He remained active into the 21st century.
10.000,00 kn

Victor Vasarely: Hexagone

Hexagone, 1988 Plexiglas containing four books 10 1/4 × 11 3/4 × 2 in 26 × 29.8 × 5.1 cm Signed by author Limited and numbered edition Incised and numbered along the bottom
10.000,00 kn

Maj 75 B

Maj 75, broj B, 1978; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Grupa jedan, dva tri, Mangelos, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
10.000,00 kn

Mangelos: Manifesti: noart

Manifesti: noart. Zagreb: Atelier Tošo Dabac, 1978. Black. Dvojezično (hrvatsko-engleski) izdanje za drugu samostalnu izložbu Dimitrija Bašičevića Mangelosa, održanu u Atelieru Toše Dabca, Zagreb 1978. godine. Predgovor Nena Dimitrijević. Stanje - odlično. Silkprint on paper. Published on the occasion of the exhibition at ATD, Zagreb, 1978. Artist's edition. With a foreword by Nena Dimitrijevic. Dimitrije Basicevic Mangelos (1921-1987), - a member of avangarde group Gorgona and participated in the Nove tendencije movement. In Croatian and English language. Very rare. Autor: Dimitrije Bašičević Mangelos Izdavač: AtD - Atelier Tošo Dabac Izdanje: prvo/first Godina: 1978 Uvez: meki Format: 14x19 Stranica: 52
10.000,00 kn

Ivan Picelj: Oeuvre programmée

Ivan Picelj: Oeuvre programmée Denise René Gallery Paris, 1966. 50x65 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak Signed and numbered. 5/50
10.000,00 kn

Ivan Picelj: Oeuvre programmée

Ivan Picelj: Oeuvre programmée Denise René Gallery Paris, 1966. 50x65 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
10.000,00 kn

Maj 75 Dž

Maj 75, broj Dž, 1980;Jovan Čekić, Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Stanislav Filko, Tomislav Gotovac, Vladimir Gudac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Sergio Pausig, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Fedor Vučemilović, Iris Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
9.500,00 kn

Maj 75 Đ

Maj 75, broj Đ, 1980;Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Vlado Martek, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Zoran Popović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
9.500,00 kn

Maj 75 Ć

Maj 75, broj Ć, 1979; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Antun Maračić 42,33 x 29,13 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
9.500,00 kn

Maj 75 Č

Maj 75, broj Č, 1979; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
9.500,00 kn

Sven Stilinović: Podroom

Artist Book 21x29,5 cm Radna zajednice umjetnika Podroom, Zagreb 1979. Samostalna izložba Svena Stilinovića se održala 6. - 13. ožujka 1979. Povodom te izložbe autor je objavio katalog s replikama radova i tekst. U tekstu piše o "velikim" radovima i objašnjava što ih čini velikima (dimenzije, što neobičniji materijal, višeznačnost i slojevitost). Smatra da umjetnici koji rade "velika djela" znaju gdje ih treba prezentirati, a to nisu mali prostori nego oni većih dimenzija i velikog značaja. Na ovoj izložbi izložio je seriju tekstova na papiru i dvije kamene kocke dimenzija 1 x 1 x 1 m, naziva Skulpura 1 i Skulptura 2. Skulpturu 3 je postavio u park Ribnjak 1. ožujka 1979., pa je u katalogu objavio dvije fotografije spomenute skulpture.
8.500,00 kn