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May 75

Grupa šestorice autora / Group of Six Artists Maj '75 / May '75 Year: 1978-1984 16 magazines: mixed media on paper, stapled Dimensions: Original Size: each 29,5 x 21 cm (11 5/8 x 8 1/4 in. Vlasta Delimar, Tomislav Gotovac, Sanja Iveković, Mangelos, Balint Szombathy, Raša Todosijević and Goran Trbuljak are a few example
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herman de vries: wit is overdaad

herman de vries: [wit is overdaad] 1st edition numbered 120 copies published by herman de vries : Arnhem 1960 artists' book with 20 white pages in folder, stapled dimensions: 13.5 × 10.5 cm In very fine condition the first book by herman de vries appeared in 1960. 'book' may be a big word for this small format booklet of a few sheets, bound with two staples and, surprisingly, without print. no title on the cover, it is blank too. on the colophon page only a few words are printed, in very pale ink and in four languages, like a poem: 'wit / wit is overdaad / blanc est surabondance / white is superabundance / weiss ist übermässig / wit / wit / wit is overdaad'. one might say that this book is at the same time an end and a beginning. it constitutes the end of the work of a scientist soon to renounce the study of nature and who has just announced this by renaming the offprints of a personal scientific publication 'manifest of castrated reality'. it also marks the final point of his parallel work as a painter, related to the abstract movement 'zero'. from 1956 herman de vries has been making monochrome paintings and from 1959, white paintings. [source: Anne Moeglin-Delcroix, 'beyond language', in herman de vries. les livres & les publications (saint-yrieix-la-perche 2005) 29]
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Miljenko Horvat: Gorgona 7

Screenprinted cover and two gelatin silver prints.. This edition of Gorgona contains 2 original photographs taken in Denmark. Photographs are identical, presenting two different stages of photographic development. Miljenko Horvat: Gorgona A photograph of the lighthouse and the dead seagull from Skagen, which Miljenko Horvat shot in 1963, during his visit to the further most north point of Denmark, was sent to Josip Vaništa and used as a photo-contribution to the anti-magazine Gorgona no. 7 from 1965. This enigmatic, but almost emblematic image contains within itself the basic principle of not only Gorgonian photography, but also of Horvat's personal approach to the medium. And this is firstly a thought, and only far after it an actual photograph of the seaside with a lighthouse and a dead seagull. The photograph unambiguously has the built-in component of the "mysterious reality".
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Mladen Stilinovic: Books

Mladen Stilinović: Knjige Mladen Stilinovic: Books Hand made Artist Book Stapled / Klamano Mixed Media: fotografije, patel, crtež, otisak prsta Iznomno rijetko / Extremely rare Vlatita naklada, 1977. 13,5x10,5 cm 22pp
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Mladen Stilinovic: U vlastitom interesu

Mladen Stilinović: U vlastitom interesu Hand made Artist Book Vlastita naklada, 1980. Klamano 15x21cm 13pp Pastel, gumeni žig, Xerox na papiru
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Slavko Kopac: Tir à cible

Slavko Kopač Tir à cible Paris, l’Art Brut, 1949. Artist Book Edition 15 23 x 9 cm Leporelo Six original engraving by Slavko Kopač
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Josip Vanista: Gorgona 6

Gorgona 6 Anti-magazine Josip Vaništa, 1961. screenprint on paper 21 x 19,4 cm
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Dieter Roth: Gorgona 9

Dieter Roth: Gorgona 9 page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 5/8" (21 x 19.3 cm); sheet: 5 7/8 x 4" (15 x 10.1 cm); overall (closed): 8 5/16 x 7 5/8 x 1/16" (21.1 x 19.4 x 0.2 cm) Zagreb, 1966. Stupidogramm (Stupidogram)
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Josip Vanista: Leonardo da Vinci

Josip Vaništa: Leonardo da Vinci Zagreb 1960/1965 Artist Book Collage. HandMade / Ručno izrađen Unique 15x21,5cm 12pp Collage S urednim papirima
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Josip Vaništa: Gorgona 1

Josip Vaništa: Gorgona 1 Zagreb, 1961. Periodical with screenprint cover and relief half-tone prints Dimensions: page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 5/8" (21 x 19.3 cm) Josip Vaništa, the group's founder, conceived the first issue, which consisted of the same photograph of an empty shop window reproduced on each of its nine pages.
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Rok 1-4 + Mixed Media

Rok 1-4 Rok 1 - Beograd 1969. godine. 22x22cm Rok 2 - Beograd 1969. godine. 22x22cm Rok 3 - Beograd, 1969. Oprema Branko Vučičević (ZMKS) 14x20cm Rok 4a - Beograd, 1970. 21x20,5cm In prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen
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Marijan Jevšovar: Gorgona 3

Marijan Jevšovar: Gorgona 3 Zagreb, 1962. Stanje: odlićno. Condition: very good. Periodical with screenprinted cover and screenprinted insert. page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" 21 x 19.2 cm Marijan Jevšovar was born in Zagreb in 1922. Besides his painting, he was an accomplished graphic designer, specialized in books and posters. He died in 1998 in Zagreb. The art of Marijan Jevšovar is punctuated by his association with Gorgona (1959 -1966).
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Ivan Kozaric: Gorgona 5

Periodical with screenprinted cover and relief half-tone plate Dimensions page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" (21 x 19.2 cm) Zagreb, 1961. The Gorgona Group was a Croatian avant-garde art group which consisted of artists and art historians: Dimitrije Bašičević-Mangelos, Miljenko Horvat, Marijan Jevšovar, Julije Knifer, Ivan Kožarić, Matko Meštrović, Radoslav Putar, Đuro Seder, Josip Vaništa, operated along the lines of anti-art in Zagreb between 1959 and 1966. Beside individual works linked to traditional techniques, the members proposed different concepts and forms of artistic communication and published the anti-magazine Gorgona - 11 issues.
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Gorgonska crna

Josip Vaništa: Gorgonska crna Noir de Gorgona Gorgona's Black Karta Silkprint / svilotisak 9,5x5,5 cm Zagreb, 1961. godine
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Braco Dimitrijevic: His Pencil's Voice

Braco Dimitrijević: His Pencil's Voice / Njegove olovke glas B/W photos Sven Stilinović & Fedor Vučemilović Galerija SC & Muzički salon Teatar ITD, Zageb, 1973. In very fine codition. Very very rare. Ursula Block’s seminal catalog of art records and anti-records, entitled Broken Music, includes several artifacts that today are coveted by collectors of unusual records. One seminal item in that catalog Njeqove Olovke Glas, a.k.a. His Pencil’s Voice, a “record” produced by the conceptual artist Braco Dimitrijević: he piece is an LP jacket with a piece of cardboard inside; the “record” is a piece of cardboard inside the jacket. Dimitrijević used a pencil to draw a spiral on the cardboard record, meant to represent the its grooves. The title, His Pencil’s Voice, is no doubt a reference to the early record label, His Master’s Voice: Little is known about His Pencil’s Voice, so I emailed Braco Dimitrijević to learn more. He is a man of few words, always keeping things to the point when conversing via email. He explained that His Pencil’s Voice was created for a solo exhibition in London’s Situation Gallery, which was a linchpin of the modern art scene in the seventies. “What bothered me always was the process of realization from the idea, the sketch to the final art work,” he explains. “This was not only in visual arts, but in music too. So I wanted to create a record with no score performed, but what is written is drawn to be played.” In essence, Dimitrijević saw His Pencil’s Voice as a more direct way of producing a final art product, cutting out the laborious production process. “I drew by hand the spiral on the paper and brought it to printers to make a zinc plate to emboss and print the label,” he recalls Source: Anomaly Index.
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Nove tendencije 1-5 (komplet)

Nove tendencije 1-5 (komplet) Komplet kataloga za Nove tendencije / Nova tendencija / Tendencije Zagreb, 1961/1973 Design Ivan Picelj Format 20x21 cm Iznimno rijetko u kompletu.
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Vlado Martek & Mladen Stilinovic: Knjigarad

Knjigarad = Bookwork. Artist Book. Limited and Rare. Galerija Studentskog centra, Zagreb 1980. This book is stapled in the center, creating space for a catalogue for two artists. The left side contains Martek's work and the right side contains Stilinović'
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Julije Knifer: Gorgona 2

Julije Knifer, Gorgona artists group. Gorgona no. 2 Zagreb 1961. Periodical with screenprinted cover and screenprinted insert. page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" (21 x 19.2 cm). Julije Knifer designed the second issue, with a serpentine black-and-white geometri
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Maj 75 A

Maj 75, broj A; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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EXAT 51: Zagreb, 1953.

EXAT 51: Manifest EXAT 51: Manifest Zagreb, 1953. A4 obostran + Proglas ONIMA, povodom zagrebačke izložbe, pisan na pisaćem stroju. Zagreb, Dvorana Društva arhitekata Hrvatske, 18.02.-04.03.1953. + EXAT 51: Zagreb 1953. Iznimno rijetko. Zagreb, Dvorana Društva arhitekata Hrvatske, 18.02.-04.03.1953. Pozivnica za izložbu Exat 51: Kristl / Picelj / Rašica / Srnec Design Ivan Picelj Jednobojni tisak (tamnosiva) na bijelom papiru. 25x11cm Stanje - odlično.
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EXAT 51: Beograd 1953.

EXAT 51: Manifest Beograd, 1953. Manifest objavljen prigodom izložbe Kristl / Picelj / Rašica / Srnec A4 Na dva lista A4, obostrano. Presavijan. Tekst Jure Kaštelan
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Victor Vasarely: Gorgona 4 (CRO)

Victor Vasarely: Gorgona 4 (CRO) Gorgona no 4. Victor Vasarely 1961. Croatian language edition. Edition privée, Josip Vaništa, Zagreb, Yougoslavie. Exemplarie 113 / 250 Izdanje na hrvatskom jeziku. Screenprinted cover and screenprinted insert page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" (21 x 19.2 cm) Vasarely's Gorgona includes several drawings from that period and the author's text. Fine condition. The Gorgona Group, was a Croatian avant-garde art group which consisted of artists and art historians: Dimitrije Bašičević-Mangelos, Miljenko Horvat, Marijan Jevšovar, Julije Knifer, Ivan Kožarić, Matko Meštrović, Radoslav Putar, Đuro Seder, Josip Vaništa, operated along the lines of anti-art in Zagreb between 1959 and 1966. Beside individual works linked to traditional techniques, the members proposed different concepts and forms of artistic communication and published the anti-magazine Gorgona - 11 issues. Autor: Victor Vasarely Izdavač: Josip Vaništa, Zagreb Izdanje: prvo/first Godina: 1961 Uvez: meki Format: 20,8x19.2
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Stjepan Planic: Problemi savremene arhitekture

Stjepan Planić: Problemi savremene arhitekture Zagreb, 1932. 23x31 cm 240pp Tvrdi uvez In Planiæ's practice of building detached houses on hills and green slopes of woodlands of the Sljeme, the regulation defining that living spaces should be looking on the street, opening the possibility of a representative façade, and the utility spaces at the back of a house, proved to be senseless and unreasonable. One of his earliest projects, a house in Jabukovac, will from that time on serve as an example of an architect's victory in his endeavours to create architecture "intended for the better life of man". Planiæ's belief in humanistic principles of the modern architecture, his persistence in the struggle to realise them and the strength of his argumentation, with considerable quantity of his personal charm, won him the triumph in confronting the regulations. It would "in the future be the aim of progress, not an obstacle." He spoke of this optimistic delusion of his, from that time, on the occasion of receiving the Life Achievements Award "Vladimir Nazor" in 1968. "The struggle for the modern is not yet won." The drawings accompanying Planiæ's projects during the interwar period witness of his personal friendship with a distinctive and a great painter Ernest Tomaševiæ, who graphically designed a number of Planiæ's articles, exhibitions and competition works. Planiæ's opus, with 700 projects and realisations, as far as we know, belongs to the most numerous and is also one where family houses prevailed around which he designed gardens. In the most individual and authentic manner he applied the vocabulary of the two idioms of the contemporary architecture - the international functional and the regionally organic. Combining the two on a structural level he created works (the stereometrically pure Round Villa in Gornje Prekrižje, the Tomislav Mountaineers Home of an Y- layout from the thirties and the cube-house from the fifties), which are anthology examples of the 20th century art memorials, as well as of the entire Croatian architecture. My assumption is that the Zagreb School of modern architecture managed to realise syntheses hard to find elsewhere, primarily in the works of Drago Ibler and Stjepan Planiæ. I believe that when explaining the Zagreb school of modern architecture, as we call it, it would be proper to apply a thesis of Ljubo Karaman, our local art historian of "creating the freedom of a peripheral environment", instead of inappropriately importing hypotheses pertaining to literature and ideology. It can explain the specificity of Ibler's and Planiæ's opuses in an infinitely more objective and convincing manner, even of the Zagreb school of modern architecture as a whole. As distinguished from a provincial milieu adopting norms and imitating solutions of great centres, Karaman believes a peripheral milieu to be the one sufficiently distanced from more powerful cultural centres (and norms and dogmas dominating them) and according to him Croatia is a typical country suited to this notion. It offers an artist greater freedom of creation, without respect for the sometimes-rigid criteria ruling great centres and power-focuses, gives him a chance to draw from two or more sources and to make creative synthesis in auspicious moments. In the earlier mentioned Stjepan Planiæ's book just about every published example is of a building ending with a living terrace and a flat roof, it is almost a manifesto. These were the common qualities of the represented projects and works. Perhaps at the time they displayed the most expressive mark of distinction from the historical, particularly the historicism architecture of roofs and metal domes of Zagreb. Stjepan Planiæ, speaking in a documentary from 1978, standing on a terrace of a multi-storey building in the Petriæ's Street 5, on the so-called “Zakladni blok” in the heart of Zagreb, designed by himself, alluded to the continuity of forms and to the significance of a terrace in the architecture of ancient civilisations and not to the paragons of contemporary building. Gesturing towards the tin dome of the First Croatian Savings Bank building, the popular Octagon, he said: "All these roofs, all these domes were the composition equipment of the preceding generation, which was then called great architecture. Driven by an aspiration to bring gardens into the centre of the city, to offer a man in urban environment a commodity of a meadow, brook, or a forest, we realised them on terraces where they blossom even today. The hanging gardens of the Queen Semiramis are not a dream, this terrace realised 40 years ago proves that, it literally realises a connection between a man and the juices of nature." "To organise life…" as Planiæ often repeated, did not mean to impose solutions, but to creatively answer the demands of life and harmoniously resolve human needs within the architectonic space. Besides writing (to begin with a book for adults "Problems of Contemporary Architecture," from 1932, to "Culture of Living," from 1985, intended for children) Planiæ wanted to effect immediate influence on individuals and small family communities. For that, he would always find time. "Three Letters on Housing" were just an example and a pattern, a drop in the ocean of talks and interpretations that Planiæ had led with the people he built houses for or with those who wanted him to design a home for them. During the seventies I often drove Planiæ on his tours of construction sites and the adaptation of my terrace apartment was taking place at that time, too. I observed a relationship of true respect and absolute obedience on the part of his craftsmen, regardless of whether they worked with him for forty years or had been engaged only recently. It was rather unusual, since in his designs and in his demands on craftsmen Planiæ always went further, often demanding new, bold and uncommon procedures. Construction carriers designed by Planiæ would, as a rule, be more slender than others were, his windows were bigger (not to mention that they were of better proportions) than those in the neighbourhood. He often "broke" the regulations of dimensioning (excessive, as a rule, due to safety precautions). He defined them according to proportions, according to the formative criteria of the whole. For example, a board of reinforced concrete of a balcony usually appears thickset and in the Round Villa (1936), the round balcony board girding three quarters of the cylindrical body of the villa is deeply protruded into space, boldly thin, elegantly elevated in space. "It even vibrates a little," commented Planiæ. That was the earliest example I can recall. In his inexhaustible creativity he always made room for something new, ranging from the use of building materials and construction to the formation. It was particularly evident in the organisation of space, which he kept returning to in his later projects, most often dealing with a dynamic play in connecting of different levels within a flat.
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Josip Stosic: Nacrti Za Pet Mojih I Jednu Vasu Pjesmu

Studentski Centar Sveucilista u Zagrebu, Josip Stosic, Zagreb, 1976. Paperback. Book Condition: Good. French poet and critic, Stephane Mallarme (1842 – 1898) was a major French symbolist poet, and his work anticipated and inspired several revolutionary ar
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