Group of Six Authors

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May 75

Grupa šestorice autora / Group of Six Artists Maj '75 / May '75 Year: 1978-1984 16 magazines: mixed media on paper, stapled Dimensions: Original Size: each 29,5 x 21 cm (11 5/8 x 8 1/4 in. Vlasta Delimar, Tomislav Gotovac, Sanja Iveković, Mangelos, Balint Szombathy, Raša Todosijević and Goran Trbuljak are a few example
Price on Request

Maj 75 A

Maj 75, broj A; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 B

Maj 75, broj B, 1978; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Grupa jedan, dva tri, Mangelos, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 E

Maj 75, broj E, 1981; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar; na naslovnici Zlatko Kutnjak "Izgažena umjetnost" 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 Dz

Maj 75, broj Dž, 1980;Jovan Čekić, Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Stanislav Filko, Tomislav Gotovac, Vladimir Gudac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Sergio Pausig, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Fedor Vučemilović, Iris Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 D

Maj 75, broj Đ, 1980;Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Vlado Martek, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Zoran Popović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 C

Maj 75, broj Ć, 1979; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Antun Maračić 42,33 x 29,13 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 C

Maj 75, broj Č, 1979; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 D

Maj 75, broj D, 1979; Vlasta Delimar, Željko Jerman, Boris Demur, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Goran Trbuljak, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 G

Maj 75, broj G, 1981; Darivoj Čada, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Živko Kladnik, Vlado Martek, Lela Mujkić, Rajko Radovanović, Darko Šimičić, Raša Todosijević, Egist Zagoričnik, Franci Zagoričnik, Orest Zagoričnik, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac; korice izradio Tomislav Gotovac "Prošenje"
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Maj 75 H

Maj 75, broj H, 1982; Tomislav Gotovac, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar, Živko Kladnik, Branka Stanković, Franci Zagoričnik, Zan Futranovitch Toupillon, Rajko Radovanović
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Maj 75 L

Maj 75, broj L, 16.1.1984;Nenad Bogdanović, Mangelos, Antun Maračić, Raša Todosijević, Jusuf Hadžifejzović, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Rajko Radovanović, Boris Demur
Price on Request

MAJ 75 I

Maj 75, BROJ I, nesvrstani, 1982; Vlasta Delimar, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Darko Šimičić, Boris Demur, Matjaž Hanžek, Boris Ivandić, Zlatko Kutnjak, Mangelos, Radomir Mašić, Branka Stanković, Mladen Stilinović, Jaroslav Supek, Balint Szombathy, Vlatko Vincek, Filimir; suradnici: Boris Cvjetanović, Goran Dvoržak, Ivo Vrtarić; fotografija na koricama Vlasta Delimar "Presvlačenje" (performans "Vjenčanje") Materijal/tehnika sitotisak na papiru, muha i selotejp na papiru Dimenzije 42,33 x 29,13 cm
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Maj 75 C

Maj 75, broj C, 1979; Darivoj Čada, Jovan Čekić, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović 21 x 29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Grupa sestorice autora: Izlozbe - akcije 1975-1977

Izložbe - akcije 1975-1977, Grupa šestorice autora. Cefft - Centar za fotografiju, film i televiziju. 25.03. - 17.04. 1977. Uključuje rad Mladena Stilinovića i jednu intervenciju u tekstu. Artist's book. Urednik edicije Mangelos. Autori koncepcije i tekst
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Maj 75 J

Maj 75 J iz 1982. godine. Ovu ediciju su pripremili Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek i Sven Stilinović. The Group of Six Authors was established in 1975 in Zagreb, Croatia and was active until 1981. The Group's members were Željko
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The Group of Six Authors: Maj 75 / F

Maj 75, broj F, 1981; Breda Beban, Rada Čupić, Vlasta Delimar, Sanja Iveković, Jasna Jurum, Vesna Miksić, Vesna Pokas, Bogdanka Poznanović, Duba Sambolec, Edita Schubert, Branka Stanković, Iris Vučemilović
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MAJ 75 / L

Grupa šestorice autora: MAJ 75 - L Zagreb, 1983. Maj 75, number L, 1983; Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Sven Stilinović, Dobrica Kamperelić, Rajko Radovanović Material/technique felt pen on newspaper Dimensions 42,33 x 29,13 cm
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Grupa sestorice autora: izlozba - akcija 25.10.75

Originalna pozivnica / fotografija za; izložba - akcija 25.10.1975. godine na Trgu Republike u Zagrebu. Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović.
1.000,00 kn

Boris Demur: Jermanovi prijatelji

Boris Demur: Jermanovi prijatelj (Jerman's friends) Mladen i Sven Stilinović Izdavač: Slavko Timotijević, Beograd Galerija srećna nova umetnost / Happy New Art Gallery Godina: 1976 Format: 14x10 Stranica: 1
450,00 kn