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Jesus Rafael Soto: Composition

Jesus Rafael Soto: Composition 1963-1965 silkprint 50x70 cm signed and numbered edition 8/100
Price on Request

Ivan Picelj: Tadeusz Szymański

Ivan Picelj: Tadeusz Szymański Muzeej za umjetnost i obrt Zagreb, 1963. godine 50x71 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak Atelier Brane Horvat / Studio S
Price on Request

Duro Seder

Đuro Seder Zagreb, 1973. godine 50x70 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Duro Seder

Đuro Seder Zagreb, 1973. godine 50x70 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
Price on Request

Duro Seder

Đuro Seder Zagreb, 1973. godine 50x70 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
Price on Request

Duro Seder

Đuro Seder Zagreb, 1973. godine Signed 50x70 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Boris Bucan: Gorki Zuvela

Boris Bućan: Gorki Žuvela Izložba Nezapolenim ulaz zabranjen Galerija suvremene umjetnosti, Zagreb 1976. High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak 97 x 68 cm
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Damnjan: Campione dell`artista

Radomir Damnjanović Damnjan Uzorak umetnika Campione dell`artista 1978. Mixed media: pečati, tekst, tkanina, fotografija 65 x 47 cm
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Maj 75 A

Maj 75, broj A; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 B

Maj 75, broj B, 1978; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Grupa jedan, dva tri, Mangelos, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 D

Maj 75, broj D, 1979; Vlasta Delimar, Željko Jerman, Boris Demur, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Goran Trbuljak, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 Dz

Maj 75, broj Dž, 1980;Jovan Čekić, Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Stanislav Filko, Tomislav Gotovac, Vladimir Gudac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Sergio Pausig, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Fedor Vučemilović, Iris Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 D

Maj 75, broj Đ, 1980;Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Vlado Martek, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Zoran Popović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
8.500,00 kn

Maj 75 E

Maj 75, broj E, 1981; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar; na naslovnici Zlatko Kutnjak "Izgažena umjetnost" 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
Price on Request

Maj 75 G

Maj 75, broj G, 1981; Darivoj Čada, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Živko Kladnik, Vlado Martek, Lela Mujkić, Rajko Radovanović, Darko Šimičić, Raša Todosijević, Egist Zagoričnik, Franci Zagoričnik, Orest Zagoričnik, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac; korice izradio Tomislav Gotovac "Prošenje"
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Maj 75 H

Maj 75, broj H, 1982; Tomislav Gotovac, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar, Živko Kladnik, Branka Stanković, Franci Zagoričnik, Zan Futranovitch Toupillon, Rajko Radovanović
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Maj 75 L

Maj 75, broj L, 16.1.1984;Nenad Bogdanović, Mangelos, Antun Maračić, Raša Todosijević, Jusuf Hadžifejzović, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Rajko Radovanović, Boris Demur
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Ivan Picelj: Braco Dimitrijevic

Ivan Picelj: Braco Dimitrijević Galerija suvremene umjetnosti, Zagreb, 1973. godine 69.5 × 50 Iz ciklusa Slučajni prolaznik / Casual passer-by I met High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Ivan Picelj: Suvremena francuska tapiserija

Ivan Picelj: Suvremena francuska tapiserija Plakat za izložbu "Suvremena francuska tapiserija" u Muzeju za umjetnost i obrt Zagreb, 1966. 48x67,5 cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Ivan Picelj: Francuska tapiserija

Ivan Picelj: Francuska tapiserija Plakat za izložbu Francuska tapiserija" u Muzeju za umjetnost i obrt. Zagreb, 1965. Arp / Delaunay / Dewasne / Deyrolle / MagnelliTaeuber Arp / Vasarelyi / Moretnsen / 48x68cm High Quality Screen Print / visokokvalitetan sitotisak
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Ivan Picelj: Fotografija u muzeju i atelieru / Mikas

Ivan Picelj: Fotografija u muzeju i atelieru - Zvonimir Mikas Zagreb, 1963. Sitotisak / Silkprint 50x70cm Plakat za izložbu "Fotografija u muzeju i atelieru - Z. Mikas" u MUO. Plakat je izveden monokromno (crna i nijanse sive). Podijeljen je horizontalno, na trećine. Gornja i donja trećina su istovjetne: svaka se sastoji od 4 niza pravokutnika u nijansama sive. Unutar prvokutnika je crna silueta leće. Središnja trećina sadrži informacije o izložbi, bijelim slovima na crnoj pozadini.
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Marko Tadic: Thank You

Mixed Media. Unikat 1/1. Originalni radovi Marka Tadića. Artist's Book iz 2009. godine. Mixed Media. Unikat 1/1. Originalni radovi Marka Tadića. Artist's Book, iz 2009. godine - napravljen u notesu Journal, izrađenom četrdesetih godina dvadesetog stol
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Goran Trbuljak

Ovom izložbom održavam kontinuitet u svom radu / With this exhibition I keep continuity of My work - Goran Trbuljak. Galerija suvremene umjetnosti, Zagreb 1979. Artist's book / plakat. Format 23x29,5 cm, rastvoren čini jedan od najpoznatijih plakat Gorana
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Skopje: Potres / EarthQuake 26.07.1963.

Skopje: Potres / EarthQuake 26.07.1963. Skopje: 26.07.1963. Potres. Luksuzno izdanje, napravljeno za državnike i diplomaciju. Mekana, fina koža.
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